CHICKEN AND SAUSAGE JAMBALAYA

Prep Time: 2 Hours
Yields: 15–20 Servings

Comment:
In the early 1700s, Spanish settlers in New Orleans brought their famous paella. Since the traditional Spanish ingredients for paella were not found in South Louisiana, the recipe was adapted to indigenous ingredients. Oysters and crawfish replaced clams and mussels, and fresh pork or andouille took the place of cured ham. The new dish was influenced by many different cultures, including the Africans who contributed their rice or yaya to jambalaya. The French later named the dish Jambon a la yaya, meaning ham with rice.

Ingredients:
3 pounds chicken, cut into 2-inch pieces
2 pounds sliced smoked sausage
¼ cup shortening or bacon drippings
2 cups diced onions
2 cups diced celery
1 cup diced bell peppers
½ cup minced garlic
8 cups beef or chicken stock
2 cups sliced mushrooms
1 cup sliced green onions
½ cup chopped parsley
salt and cayenne pepper to taste
Louisiana hot sauce to taste
5 cups uncooked long-grain rice

Method:
In a 7-quart, cast iron Dutch oven, heat shortening or bacon drippings over medium-high heat. Sauté chicken 30 minutes or until dark brown on all sides and beginning to stick to bottom of pot. This process is important because jambalaya’s brown color is derived from the color of the meat. Add smoked sausage and stir fry 10–15 minutes. Tilt pot to one side and ladle out all oil, except 1 large cooking spoonful. Add onions, celery, bell peppers and minced garlic. Continue cooking until all vegetables are well caramelized, being careful not to scorch them. Pour in stock, bring to a rolling boil then reduce heat to simmer. Cook 15 minutes to allow flavors to develop. Stir in mushrooms, green onions and parsley. Season to taste with salt, cayenne pepper and hot sauce. If desired, slightly over-season dish since rice has not yet been added. Add rice, reduce heat to low, cover and cook 30–45 minutes. Stir every 15 minutes. Do not uncover except to stir. When cooked, stir and let steam 10 minutes before serving.

From “The Encyclopedia of Cajun & Creole Cuisine,” Chef John Folse, Owner & CEO of Chef John Folse & Company, 2517 South Philippe Avenue, Gonzales, La. 70737, www.jfolse.com.

 


 

LOUISIANA SEAFOOD GUMBO

Prep Time: 1½ Hours
Yields: 12 Servings

Comment:
Seafood gumbo is the premier soup of Cajun Country, and it is known worldwide as the dish to seek out when visiting South Louisiana. Every Louisiana home has its own unique ingredients and methods for cooking gumbo.

Ingredients:
1 pound (35-count) shrimp, peeled, deveined and divided
1 pound jumbo lump crabmeat
2 dozen shucked oysters, liquid reserved
1 pound claw crabmeat
1 cup sliced frozen okra
1 cup vegetable oil
1 cup flour
2 cups (¼-inch) diced onions
1 cup (¼-inch) diced celery
1 cup (¼-inch) diced bell peppers
¼ cup minced garlic
½ pound sliced andouille sausage
3 quarts hot shellfish stock
2 cups sliced green onions
½ cup chopped parsley
salt and cayenne pepper to taste
granulated garlic to taste
Louisiana hot sauce to taste

Method:
In a 7-quart Dutch oven, heat oil over medium-high heat. Whisk in flour, stirring constantly until a brown roux is achieved. Add onions, celery, bell peppers and minced garlic and sauté 3–5 minutes or until vegetables are wilted. Stir in andouille and sauté an additional 3–5 minutes. Stir in ½ cup of shrimp, claw crabmeat and okra. Slowly add hot shellfish stock, one ladle at a time, stirring constantly. Bring mixture to a low boil, reduce to simmer and cook 30–45 minutes. Additional stock may be needed to retain volume. Add green onions and parsley. Season to taste using salt, cayenne pepper, granulated garlic and hot sauce. Fold in remaining shrimp, lump crabmeat, oysters and reserved oyster liquid. Return to a low boil and cook approximately 5 minutes. Adjust seasonings if necessary. Serve over cooked rice.

From “Hooks, Lies & Alibis: Louisiana’s Authoritative Collection of Game Fish & Seafood Cookery,” Chef John Folse & Michaela York, Chef John Folse & Company Publishing, 2517 South Philippe Avenue, Gonzales, La. 70737, www.jfolse.com.

 


 

LOUISIANA-STYLE CRAWFISH ÉTOUFFÉE

Prep Time: 1 Hour
Yields: 6 Servings

Comment:
The French word, “étouffée,” means “to smother” or “to suffocate.” In Louisiana, étouffée refers to the Cajun dish of seafood, chicken or game stew and seasoning vegetables, served over rice. Though more Creole in origin, étouffées are found throughout Louisiana.

Ingredients:
2 pounds crawfish tails, cleaned
¼ pound butter
1 cup diced onions
½ cup diced celery
½ cup diced green bell peppers
½ cup diced red bell peppers
2 tbsps minced garlic
½ cup diced tomatoes
2 bay leaves
1 cup flour
½ cup tomato sauce
2 quarts water or shellfish stock
1 ounce sherry
1 cup sliced green onions
½ cup chopped parsley
salt and cayenne pepper to taste
granulated garlic to taste
Louisiana hot sauce to taste

Method:
In a 2-gallon saucepot, melt butter over medium-high heat. Add onions, celery, bell peppers, minced garlic, tomatoes and bay leaves. Sauté 3–5 minutes or until vegetables are wilted. Whisk in flour and cook, stirring constantly until a white roux is achieved. Blend crawfish tails and tomato sauce into mixture. Cook 5 minutes, stirring to prevent tomato sauce from scorching. Slowly add stock or water until a sauce-like consistency is achieved. Bring to a rolling boil then reduce to simmer and cook 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Additional stock may be needed to retain consistency. Remove and discard bay leaves. Stir in sherry, green onions and parsley. Cook 5 minutes then season to taste with salt, cayenne and granulated garlic. Serve over steamed white rice with a few dashes of hot sauce.

From “After the Hunt: Louisiana’s Authoritative Collection of Wild Game & Game Fish Cookery,” Chef John Folse, CEC, AAC, Owner & CEO of Chef John Folse & Company, 2517 South Philippe Avenue, Gonzales, La. 70737, www.jfolse.com.

 


 

WHITE CHOCOLATE BREAD PUDDING

Prep Time: 2 Hours
Yields: 6–8 Servings

Comment:
Bread pudding is considered the "apple pie" of South Louisiana. Because of our heavy French influence, crusty French bread is abundant. Our German population gave us a good supply of milk and eggs. The combination of these cultures and their ingredients gave us one of our premier desserts.

Ingredients:
9 ounces white chocolate
3 (10-inch) loaves French bread
4 eggs
6 egg yolks
4 cups heavy whipping cream
1 cup milk
1 cup sugar

Method:
Slice French bread into ½-inch thick round croutons and set aside. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together eggs and egg yolks. Set aside. In a large saucepan, combine cream, milk and sugar. Bring mixture to a low simmer then add white chocolate. Whisk until chocolate is completely melted. Remove pot from heat and quickly stir in whisked eggs. Blend thoroughly to keep eggs from scrambling. In a 9" x 13" baking dish, place bread slices in 2–3 layers. Pour half of cream mixture over bread. Press bread gently, allowing cream mixture to be absorbed evenly into bread. Once most of mixture has been soaked up, pour remaining cream over bread and press gently. Cover dish with foil and let soak a minimum of 5 hours prior to baking. Preheat oven to 300°F. Bake covered approximately 1 hour. Remove foil and bake 45 additional minutes or until top is golden brown. This bread pudding is best chilled in refrigerator overnight then cut into squares and heated in individual portions in microwave. If desired, create a white chocolate sauce for topping bread pudding by combining 8 ounces melted white chocolate and 3 ounces heavy whipping cream. This may be done in a double boiler or microwave.

From “The Encyclopedia of Cajun & Creole Cuisine,” Chef John Folse, Owner & CEO of Chef John Folse & Company, 2517 South Philippe Avenue, Gonzales, La. 70737, www.jfolse.com.