clementine-hunter-murals

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM

Clementine Hunter Murals
Image highlights from the Louisiana State Museum’s new exhibition at the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame and Northwest Louisiana History Museum

Panoramic view showing several Clementine Hunter murals on site at the African House, Melrose Plantation, 2010. All murals by Clementine Hunter, 1955, oil on wood. Loaned by Association for the Preservation of Historic Natchitoches.

Spring Planting and Wedding: In this mural, Hunter combines a wedding tableau and a planting scene into a celebration of fertility to signal the arrival of spring.Harvest Time: Hunter, who picked cotton for much of her life
said she could pick 150 and sometimes 200 pounds of cotton in a day.

 

Wash Day: This mural is based on Hunter’s memories of washing laundry in an iron pot and hanging the colorful clothing to dry in the sunshine. A self portrait of the artist, busy at her easel, appears in this depiction of wash day on the plantation. Detail, right.Pictorial Map of Cane River Country: Hunter based this representation of the area between the Cane and Red rivers on a Cane River commemorative plate.

 

All murals by Clementine Hunter, 1955, oil on wood. Loaned by Association for the Preservation of Historic Natchitoches.

Above, left, Baptism: Hunter’s religious imagery is rooted in Catholic and Baptist teachings, and infused with African elements. Detail, left.

Above, right, Cane River Funeral: Hunter’s depiction of a traditional Cane River funeral suggests that, while tears are shed, a funeral is a happy occasion celebrating the journey to a heavenly reward. Detail, right.

 

Melrose Plantation, Yucca House: In addition to Yucca House, the original plantation home on Melrose Plantation, this mural features a sundial.Melrose Plantation, Big House and African House: Hunter’s composition features Marie Thérèse and Thomas Metoyer, whose children founded what is now known as Melrose Plantation.

 

Honky-Tonk and Pecan Harvest: While children shake pecans out of the pecan trees, adults play cards, drink and dance in the nearby honky tonk. Details, right.


This project was supported through funding provided by Cane River National Heritage Area, Inc.