Historic Contexts | National Register | Division of Historic Preservation

Eligibility and BenefitsProcess and FormsNomination Packet
Historic ContextsReview CommitteeDatabase

Historic contexts are those patterns, themes, or trends in history by which a specific occurrence, property, or site is understood and its meaning (or significance) within history is made clear. Contexts provide the background necessary to understand why a resource may be significant. A historic context document identifies and explains in detail those patterns, themes, or trends that apply within the resource's state.

The contexts developed for Louisiana thus far help the National Register staff evaluate eligibility by describing the types of properties associated with each context, the physical characteristics of those properties and which of these is required for eligibility, and the locations where these properties are likely to be found. Lastly, a historic context is used as part of a required component of a National Register nomination narrative. The context summarizes the trend or theme to which the resource relates, explains how the resource reflects or illustrates that theme, and compares the nominated resource to other resources associated with the theme. 

Some of the links provided are National Register Multiple Property Submissions. The main component of a Multiple Property Submission is the Multiple Property Documentation Form (MPDF, or cover document) that includes historic contexts related to a property type or theme and defines registration requirements individual properties must meet to be nominated under it. Multiple Property Submission links will include the MPDF and links to any individual properties already listed under it. 

Architectural Styles: 

Historic Themes:

 

For more information contact
Emily Ardoin, National Register Coordinator

Mailing AddressP.O. Box 44247
Baton Rouge LA 70804
Phone:(225) 219-4595
Fax:(225) 219-9772
Email:eardoin@crt.la.gov

 

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